A Study On Lowering Soil pH With Vinegar

How does lowering soil pH with vinegar work, especially after your soil tests a high level of acidity that could harm your crops?

If you have been a serious gardener, you are sure to have come across the words pH levels, especially when testing your soil.

The soil pH means the acidity or alkalinity levels in the soil. A soil test checks for potash, nitrogen, phosphorus, and pH. Understanding your soil pH levels is essential in your gardening journey.

If your soil has high pH levels, it is known as alkaline, and it is not a hospitable environment for most plants.  To balance this out, you will need to increase your soil’s acidity.

Some plants need a lower level of pH than others to grow successfully. Fortunately, adding a little bit of vinegar to your soil can increase the acidity while correcting the pH levels to suit your plant’s needs.

The Soil pH Basics

Different types of plants require different levels of soil pH to thrive. PH level 1 to 6 is acidic, level 7 is neutral, and 8 to 14 is alkaline.

The soil pH varies from one region to the other and one garden to the next. Most plants require a PH value of 6.5 and 7, while others require acidic conditions that can be created with the help of vinegar.

To determine your soil’s pH level be sure to test your soil before amending it with vinegar. Once you amend, check the pH regularly to ensure vinegar is not making the soil too acidic for your plants.

How Does Vinegar Work To Help The Soil Besides Lowering The pH

Besides lowering the soil pH, vinegar acts as a herbicide for plants, preventing pest infestation. It also hinders the growth of weeds in the soil causing your plants to grow weed-free. The ascetic acid in vinegar also dissolves insoluble calcium salts that flow away with rainwater.

However, if your soil is very much alkaline or highly rich inline, the base will neutralize the acidity of the vinegar. Therefore the vinegar might not affect the pH of your soil.

Vinegar is a safe, cost-friendly method to lower your soil pH, but it does not provide long-standing solutions for large-scale use.

Read more about Is Adding Lime To Soil For Tomatoes A Good Idea?

Why Do You Need Vinegar When Lowering Your Soil pH

The soil pH level affects the ability of the plants to uptake certain nutrients. Generally, plants enjoy a neutral ph level of around 7, although certain plants have been known to thrive in more extreme soils. So basically, you have two reasons why you would want to lower the pH in your soil. They include:

You will need to lower the pH of your soil because it is too alkaline, and it is negatively affecting your plant’s growth. When your soil has a high pH level, certain minerals like manganese and iron are not available to the plant. You will need to lower the pH of your soil to bring it towards a neutral pH so that your plants can thrive.

Why Do You Need Vinegar When Lowering Your Soil pH

You will need to lower the pH in your soil to grow specific plants that require slightly acidic soils. If you want to make a special garden to grow some plants like roses and raspberries, you will need to lower your soil pH to make it slightly acidic.

Click here to learn How To Clean An Air Stone

How To Lower Your Soil pH Using Vinegar

Soil and the environment play a huge role in the growth and development of plants. Only through the soil can the plants get all the nutrients.

Highly acidic soils lack essential nutrients like boron, manganese, phosphorus, etc. Plants that thrive in acidic soils include blueberries roses, but many plants have limited problematic growth in alkaline soils.

So to change the nature of your soil to suit your plants, you can use vinegar to do so following these steps.

    • First, take a soil test to determine your soil pH level. Note that the values vary across different areas and depths of your garden. However, a test can give you a rough idea of what you need to do.

    • Based on how low you want your soil pH, add vinegar plain or distilled to your soil. The household vinegar, both plain or distilled, has about 5% acetic acid, safe and harmless. The horticultural vinegar has higher concentrations with about 20% of acetic acid. Therefore, you should exercise caution if you use horticultural vinegar for a quick fix.

    • Test your water for its pH level using a ph tester to determine its hardness. Water has a pH level that varies across different regions. Most tap water is alkaline; therefore, it is vital to test your water before use.

    • Add vinegar to your tested water and not the other way round. You can add 2 to 9 tablespoons of vinegar to 1 gallon of water.  After adding the vinegar, test your water using the PH tester. If you have the desired value, do not add any more vinegar. Remember to note down how much vinegar you have added.

    • Put this diluted mixture into the soil using a watering can or hose. Inject into the irrigation system or water manually based on the size of your garden and the amount of solution you require to change the soil pH.

Luster Leaf 1601 Rapitest Test Kit for Soil pH, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potash

Do not add vinegar to the water in your reservoir because if the vinegar is unpasteurized or contains sugar residue or alcohol, it can react to form the mother of vinegar. The reservoir might become laden with scum-like vinegar which is not healthy for your soil.

Continue watering your soil with vinegar at regular intervals while testing your soil pH frequently. Please note that bacterial actions can degrade the strength of ascetic acid used over time. Therefore, you will need to fix this problem before using vinegar to lower pH.

Check Out This Aeroponics Nutrient Solution Recipe

Can Vinegar Harm Your Plants?

Vinegar is still an acid despite its availability and usefulness, and it can be harmful to your plans if mismanaged.

Do not use vinegar straight on plants or on the soil to try and quicken the acidifying process. Vinegar may not permanently kill your plants, but it can kill off blooms and produce more acidic soil than you wanted.

Household vinegar is already a diluted acid with over 90% water. When you mix it with more water to use in your soil, the mixture becomes relatively mild and suitable for your soils. I’m attempting to change your son’s chemical makeup composition; it is best to slow down and often test over some time. Don’t look for shortcuts by increasing vinegar use without testing your soil.

Other Garden Uses For Vinegar

Vinegar has other uses in gardening that include

    • Killing unwanted grass and weeds along walkways and driveways

    • It helps raise your hands after handling lime to avoid irritation

    • It is an organic-friendly alternative in killing pests

    • Adding vinegar to compost gives it minerals making it more acidic.

Other Garden Uses For Vinegar

Conclusion

Lowering soil pH with vinegar is one of the easiest and organic ways in helping your soil copper with high acidity levels. Therefore, using vinegar to lower soil pH gradually using multiple amendments that will give you the expected results.

Remember to work patiently with vinegar because, as we have learnt, it also contains an acid that could burn or destroy your crops and soil if poorly used.